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Christopher Pissarides, Nobel Prize winner in Economics

agrees Basic Income
I am very much in favour, as long as we know how to apply it without taking away incentive to work at the lower end of the market
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William A. Darity, Professor of Public Policy at Duke University

agrees Job Guarantee
Each job offered under a federal employment assurance would be at a wage rate above the poverty threshold, and would include benefits like health insurance. A public sector job guarantee would establish a quality of work and the level of compensation offered for all jobs. The program would be great for the country: It could meet a wide range of the nation’s physical and human infrastructure needs,... See More
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Erik Brynjolfsson, Professor at MIT

agrees Carbon Tax
If we're willing to send half a million fellow citizens into battle, to protect oil supplies and our economic way of life, we should be no less willing to make the small sacrifice of paying more for gasoline. A revenue-neutral plan that reduced Social Security taxes by $1 billion for every penny a gallon of gas tax would leave the working poor and middle class better off than before. In the long t... See More
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Paul Krugman, Economist (nobel laureate) and NY Times columnist

agrees Carbon Tax
Emissions taxes are the Economics 101 solution to pollution problems; every economist I know would start cheering wildly if Congress voted in a clean, across-the-board carbon tax.
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Greg Mankiw, Harvard professor in economics

agrees Carbon Tax
People don't want to think about climate change every time they do every decision. They can't. What a carbon tax does is it nudges them in the direction of doing the right thing. But you can cut other taxes in response.
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Yanis Varoufakis, Former finance minister of Greece, is Professor of Economics at the University of Athens

agrees Basic Income
Either we are going to have a basic income that regulates this new society of ours, or we are going to have very substantial social conflicts that get far worse with xenophobia and refugees and migration and so forth.
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Bill Mitchell, Professor of Economics and Musician

disagrees Basic Income
A basic income guarantee is a neo-liberal strategy for serfdom without the work ... In addition to a Job Guarantee we also demand a Services Guarantee. It is no good having a bare minimum income if the dentists and doctors and shops in your town are closed and the public transport system is deficient.
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Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Essayist, scholar, statistician, former trader, and risk analyst

There are resilient ways to solve problems, say feed the world, without complicated technologies that entail fragility and unkown possibilities.
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Juan Manuel Santos,

The business of illicit drugs is behind violence, corruption and crime in almost the entire planet, and we have to recognize that the so-called War on Drugs - which has been going on for half a century - has not been won or won.
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Vince Cable,

I’m very anti-drugs. I’m very puritanical about it. But the simple truth is that by turning over the marijuana trade to the underworld, it’s creating opportunities for them and it’s making things worse.
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David Autor, Economist

It doesn’t really make sense to ask whether automation will affect jobs. Yes, 100 percent of jobs will be affected. Jobs change all of the time. The content of jobs will change. But it’s not as if there’s a fixed amount of work to do. The net number of jobs is rising. Job tasks are changing. In many cases that automation is complementary to the tasks that people do. For example, doctors’ work i... See More
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Andrew McAfee,

As digital devices like computers and robots get more capable thanks to Moore’s Law (the proposition that the number of transistors on a semiconductor can be inexpensively doubled about every two years), they can do more of the work that people used to do. Digital labor, in short, substitutes for human labor.
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Joel Mokyr,

I don’t see an easy way of solving it [mass unemployment]. It’s an inevitable consequence of technological progress.
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Lawrence Summers, Economist and Harvard University Professor

It is widely feared that half the jobs in the economy might be eliminated by innovations such as self-driving vehicles, automatic checkout machines and expert systems that trade securities more effectively than humans can.
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Dean Baker, Macroeconomist and codirector of the Center for Economic and Policy Research

disagrees Robot Tax
[This] is a tax on productivity growth.
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Robert J. Shiller, Professor of economics at Yale and Nobel laureate

agrees Robot Tax
A moderate tax on robots, even a temporary tax that merely slows the adoption of disruptive technology, seems a natural component of a policy to address rising inequality. Revenue could be targeted toward wage insurance, to help people replaced by new technology make the transition to a different career. This would accord with our natural sense of justice, and thus be likely to endure.
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Sheryl Sandberg, American technology executive, activist, and author

Today’s decision from the Federal Communications Commission to end net neutrality is disappointing and harmful. An open internet is critical for new ideas and economic opportunity – and internet providers shouldn't be able to decide what people can see online or charge more for certain websites. We’re ready to work with members of Congress and others to help make the internet free and open for eve... See More
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John Key, 38th prime minister of new zealand

agrees Euthanasia
If I had terminal cancer, I had a few weeks to live, I was in tremendous amount of pain - if they just effectively wanted to turn off the switch and legalise that by legalising euthanasia, I'd want that.
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Christian Dustmann, Economist

A key concern of the public debate on migration is whether immigrants contribute their fair share to the tax and welfare systems. Our new analysis draws a positive picture of the overall fiscal contribution made by recent immigrant cohorts, particularly of immigrants arriving from the EU.
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Francine Blau, Economist

The evidence does not suggest that current immigrant flows cost native-born taxpayers money over the long-run nor does it provide support for the notion that lowering immigration quotas or stepping up enforcement of existing immigration laws would generate savings to existing taxpayers.
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Jonathan Portes,

HMRC has also published important new data about the fiscal contribution made by recently arrived EEA nationals, showing that they paid more than £3bn in taxes on income while claiming about £0.5bn in HMRC benefits. This provides further confirmation that EU migrants have made a strongly positive contribution to the UK economy and public finances.
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George Borjas, Economist

The presence of all immigrant workers (legal and illegal) in the labor market makes the U.S. economy (GDP) an estimated 11 percent larger ($1.6 trillion) each year.
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Elaine Chao,

disagrees Tariffs
Smoot and Hawley ginned up The Tariff Act of 1930 to get America back to work after the Stock Market Crash of '29. Instead, it destroyed trade so effectively that by 1932, American exports to Europe were just a third of what they had been in 1929. World trade fell two-thirds as other nations retaliated. Jobs evaporated.
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Thomas Sowell, American economist

disagrees Tariffs
Tariffs that save jobs in the steel industry mean higher steel prices, which in turn means fewer sales of American steel products around the world and losses of far more jobs than are saved.
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Milton Friedman, American economist

disagrees Tariffs
The benefits of a tariff are visible. Union workers can see they are "protected". The harm which a tariff does is invisible. It's spread widely. There are people that don't have jobs because of tariffs but they don't know it.
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Walter E. Williams,

disagrees Tariffs
Tariff policy beneficiaries are always visible, but its victims are mostly invisible. Politicians love this. The reason is simple: The beneficiaries know for whom to cast their ballots, and the victims don't know whom to blame for their calamity.
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Nicholas Bloom, Professor of economics

disagrees Tariffs
Many people who have lost out in the last few decades voted for Trump. Trump will have a difficult time turning them into winners. The jobs of these people are not at risk because of Chinese or Mexican workers, but because of robots and computers. And new trade barriers and higher tariffs are not going to change that.
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Paul Krugman, Economist (nobel laureate) and NY Times columnist

disagrees Tariffs
Trump’s tariffs are badly designed even from the point of view of someone who shares his crude mercantilist view of trade. In fact, the structure of his tariffs so far is designed to inflict maximum damage on the U.S. economy, for minimal gain.
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Michael Pettis, Professor of finance

disagrees Tariffs
Put differently, surpluses don’t arise because surplus countries can produce goods more productively or efficiently. They arise from the need to export domestic savings caused by the low household income share of GDP. Because surplus countries direct their excess savings mainly to the US, the only economy deep, flexible and open enough to absorb them, it is the US that must inevitably run capital ... See More
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Peter Navarro, American economist

agrees Tariffs
Our view is that these actions [Trump's tariffs] are necessary to defend this country, and that they are ultimately bullish for Corporate America, for the working men and women of America, and for the global trading system.
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Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel laureate economist based at Columbia University

disagrees Tariffs
With the election of Trump, America's soft power has taken a big hit. The United States has moved from a position of leadership in the creation of a rules-based international system to a position of leadership in its destruction and the creation of a regime of global protectionism. The damage will be long-lasting.
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Manmohan Singh, Former prime minister of India

disagrees Tariffs
Protectionism is a very real danger. It is understandable that in times of a severe downturn protectionist pressures mount but the lessons of history are clear. If we give in to protectionist pressures, we will only send the world into a downward spiral.
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Lawrence Kudlow,

disagrees Tariffs
The biggest flaw in the Trump economic plan is the tilt toward protectionism. I have parted company with him on this. The question here is whether his campaign bark will turn out to be bigger than his government-policy bite.
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Robert Mundell, Canadian economist

agrees Tariffs
The United States can't keep a completely open system if the rest of the world is less open. The United States may have to take a leaf out of the book of Japan, China, and Germany, and have protectionism inside the system.
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Juan Manuel Santos,

disagrees Tariffs
Protectionism is something that will hurt everybody, but especially the United States.
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Stephen Harper, Canadian economist

disagrees Tariffs
We have to remember we're in a global economy. The purpose of fiscal stimulus is not simply to sustain activity in our national economies, but to help the global economy as well, and that's why it's so critical that measures in those packages avoid anything that smacks of protectionism.
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Alan Greenspan, American economist

disagrees Tariffs
Protectionism will do little to create jobs and if foreigners retaliate, we will surely lose jobs.
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Elizabeth Warren, 28th united states senator from massachusetts (class 1)

Disease, sickness, and old age touch every family. Tragedy doesn't ask who you voted for. Health care is a basic human right.
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Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel laureate economist based at Columbia University

As the gap between rich and poor keeps growing and part-time jobs become more common, we must strengthen the social safety net. Universal health coverage would give essential protection, and needs to be part of every society.
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Winona LaDuke,

disagrees Fracking
Someone needs to explain to me why wanting clean drinking water makes you an activist, and why proposing to destroy water with chemical warfare doesn't make a corporation a terrorist.
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Farid Khavari,

disagrees Fracking
By the time the frackers are done in the other states our water will be worth more than oil.
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MIchael Hudson, Economist. Research Professor of Economics at the University of Missouri, Kansas City.

disagrees Fracking
You have a choice. Either you can have more oil, or more clean water. Fracking is not good for the water supply.
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John Lott,

We have tried an assault weapons ban in the United States for ten years and there's no evidence it has any impact.
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Sam Bowman,

disagrees Soda taxes
A tax on sugary soft drinks is the first step on the road to fat taxes and sugar taxes more generally. It makes little sense to tax sugary drinks on their own, rather than sugar more generally – a couple of Mars bars are just as bad as a bottle of Coke – but the Chancellor probably reckons that the public won’t care if he only targets soft drinks. Once the tax is in place, he will follow the lead ... See More
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Robert Reich, Former Secretary of Labor

agrees Basic Income
A minimal guarantee with regard to income, it seems to me as almost inevitable in terms the direction that the structural changes of our economy are taking us in.
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Christine Lagarde, IMF Managing Director

disagrees Brexit
It is bound to be a negative on all fronts. For those that stay, because there are fewer of them, and for those who go, because they lose the benefit of facilitation of exchange.
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Mark Carney, Bank of England Governor

disagrees Brexit
Brexit could hit the country's £2.04 trillion economy and prompt some banks to move away from London's global financial powerhouse
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Tony Atkinson, Research Fellow at Oxford and Professor at the London School of Economics

disagrees Basic Income
I don’t in fact favour a basic income as such, what I favour is what I call a participation income
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Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel laureate economist based at Columbia University

disagrees Basic Income
You want your government to think more carefully about targeting programmes that help those in need, rather than universal. That’s a trade-off given the budget constraints on the public sector
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George Soros, Business magnate, investor, and philanthropist

disagrees Brexit
The UK will struggle if it cuts itself off from the rest of Europe
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