Agree:

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Paul Krugman Economist (nobel laureate) and NY Times columnist

Emissions taxes are the Economics 101 solution to pollution problems; every economist I know would start cheering wildly if Congress voted in a clean, across-the-board carbon tax.
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Jefferey Sachs American economist

Each region of the world should introduce a tax on CO2 emissions that starts low today and increases gradually and predictably in the future
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Erik Brynjolfsson Professor at MIT

If we're willing to send half a million fellow citizens into battle, to protect oil supplies and our economic way of life, we should be no less willing to make the small sacrifice of paying more for gasoline. A revenue-neutral plan that reduced Social Security taxes by $1 billion for every penny a gallon of gas tax would leave the working poor and middle class better off than before. In the long t... See More
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WiIlliam Nordhaus Professor of economics at Yale University

Actually from an economic point of view, it's a pretty simple problem
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Richard Posner

Stiff taxes will put pressure on the energy industry to achieve technological breakthroughs (such as sequestration of carbon dioxide) that will greatly reduce the use of fossil fuels.
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Martin Feldstein Economics Professor @ Harvard University & President Emeritus, National Bureau of Economic Res

Two-thirds of American households will receive more in carbon dividends than they will pay directly in carbon taxes.
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Gary Becker

We should seek out the many forms of subsidy that run through the entire energy enterprise and eliminate them. In their place we propose a measure that could go a long way toward leveling the playing field: a revenue-neutral tax on carbon, a major pollutant.
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Robert H. Frank University of California, Berkeley, Georgia Institute of Technology

Reducing CO2 emissions would actually be surprisingly easy. The most effective remedy would be a carbon tax, which would raise the after-tax price of goods in rough proportion to the size of their carbon footprint.
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Nouriel Roubini Professor at Stern School, NYU, Chairman of Roubini Macro Associates, blog at https://t.co/sby

It Is High Time for a Carbon Tax
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Hal Varian Chief Economist at Google

...there are several good reasons that increasing the gasoline tax in the United States makes economic sense
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Robert Reich American political economist

The single most important thing we can do -- the single solution -- is to put a price on carbon.
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Laura Tyson American business academic

Economists across the political spectrum agree that a carbon tax is the most effective way to discourage carbon consumption and lower the risks of catastrophic climate changes.
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George Shultz American economist, statesman, and businessman

There has to be a way to level the playing field and cause those forms of energy to bear their true costs. That means putting a price on carbon.
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Lawrence Summers Economist and Harvard University Professor

But there should be no doubt that starting from the current zero tax rate on carbon, increased taxation would be desirable

Disagree:

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Patrick Michaels Climatologist

The fact that there isn’t any temperature trend whatsoever in the last 16 years is forcing scientists to confront the reality that the carbon taxers are choosing to evade
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