Agree:

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William A. Darity Professor of Public Policy at Duke University

Each job offered under a federal employment assurance would be at a wage rate above the poverty threshold, and would include benefits like health insurance. A public sector job guarantee would establish a quality of work and the level of compensation offered for all jobs. The program would be great for the country: It could meet a wide range of the nation’s physical and human infrastructure needs,... See More
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Randall Wray Professor of Economics at U. Missouri–Kansas City, Senior Scholar at Levy Economics Institute

Estimated spending will be 1–2 percent of GDP, with economic, social and political benefits several times larger. Net program costs will be much lower, since spending on unemployment compensation and other relief will be reduced—this program will pay people for working, rather than paying them not to work. The promise of increased national productivity and shared prosperity should far outweigh an... See More
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Centre for American Progress Progressive public policy research and advocacy organization

[We propose] a jobs guarantee to counter the effects of reduced bargaining power, technical change, globalization, and the Great Recession

Disagree:

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Josh Barro Senior editor for Business Insider

While I favor policies to tighten the labor market, I'm not sure how a job guarantee would work. What if you can't do anything useful? What if you're terrible at your guaranteed job? There are things the government could be doing to foster job creation in recessions — deficit spending, nominal GDP targeting, a higher default level of inflation, countercyclical infrastructure investment — that stri... See More
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Annie Lowrey Economic policy journalist at The Atlantic

The CAP proposal [jobs guarantee] leaves a number of questions unanswered. For example, the report suggests turning the current pool of unemployed, displaced, and discouraged workers into teachers’ aides, EMTs, and elder-care assistants. But those are jobs that require a considerable amount of training and skill, and are generally long-term careers rather than temporary gigs.
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The Economist Weekly magazine-format newspaper

Rather than having the government find jobs for everyone, how about we have the government not fire people from useful government jobs they know how to do well in the middle of a recession?
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