Agree:

Open uri20170825 4 8rzufa?1503670405

Robert J. Shiller Professor of economics at Yale and Nobel laureate

A moderate tax on robots, even a temporary tax that merely slows the adoption of disruptive technology, seems a natural component of a policy to address rising inequality. Revenue could be targeted towards wage insurance, to help people replaced by new technology make the transition to a different career. This would accord with our natural sense of justice, and thus be likely to endure.
Open uri20170825 4 8rzufa?1503670405

Robert J. Shiller Professor of economics at Yale and Nobel laureate

A moderate tax on robots, even a temporary tax that merely slows the adoption of disruptive technology, seems a natural component of a policy to address rising inequality. Revenue could be targeted toward wage insurance, to help people replaced by new technology make the transition to a different career. This would accord with our natural sense of justice, and thus be likely to endure.

Disagree:

Open uri20170831 4 1dafrgk?1504188392

Lawrence H. Summers Harvard economist and former US Treasury secretary

First, I cannot see any logic to singling out robots as job destroyers. There are many kinds of innovation that allow the production of more or better output with less labor input. Why pick on robots? Second, much innovative activity, even of a robotlike variety, involves producing better goods and services rather than simply extracting more output from the same input. Third, and perhaps most fund... See More

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